Thousands look up newly available records of their Irish ancestors

Thousands of people have been logging on to the Irish Genealogy website this week hoping to find some new information about their family history.

Ireland’s General Register Office released 27 million records of births, marriages and deaths all the way up to 2013. The birth index goes back to 1900, the marriage index back to 1903 and the death index back to 1966.

Genealogy - records online Annie Moore photo Ireland Calling

It is thanks to the government’s Civil Registration Amendment Bill 2014, which removes obstacles to public access of records.

Arts and Heritage Minister Jimmy Deenihan said: “Genealogy is an important way of connecting with those abroad who wish to trace their roots and also permitting those here in Ireland to establish their family history.

Interested in discovering more about your Irish roots? This free online genealogy course with Strathclyde University shows you how to trace your family tree and also covers the use of DNA testing in genealogical research.

“It can also be of significant economic benefit to the country in the development of cultural tourism and in attracting visitors to Ireland to trace their ancestry, visit their ancestral homes etc. In addition, genealogy is also immensely important from a social history perspective”.

The website is now by far the largest Irish genealogy resource available online.

There are millions of people of Irish descent across the world and it is expected that this new resource will encourage many to start researching their family history.

Interested in discovering more about your Irish roots? This free online genealogy course with Strathclyde University shows you how to trace your family tree and also covers the use of DNA testing in genealogical research.

Did you know?

‘Irish giant’ Tom Crean was one of the bravest and toughest explorers of the early part of the 20th century. Thanks to his positivity and faith, he managed to not only survive horrific conditions but also save the lives of his colleagues. Find out more.

Comments are closed.