Brexit Britain’s loss is Ireland’s gain as New Zealand sees Dublin as new gateway to Europe

Ireland import/export

Britain has long been seen by countries across the world as the gateway to the lucrative Single Market of the European Union.

Numerous multinational companies including Japanese car manufacturers have invested billions in Britain so they can have tariff free trade with the EU.

However, Britain’s decision to leave the European Union means that access may no longer be available and so countries are looking for alternatives, with Ireland being an attractive and obvious choice.

Ireland import/export

Australia was one of the first countries to make the connection. Foreign Minister Julie Bishop told the Irish Times: “Many Australian firms have accessed the EU via Britain. With the uncertainty surrounding what a post-Brexit Britain will look like, I believe Australian firms will look to Ireland to fulfil that role.”

Interested in discovering more about your Irish roots? This free online genealogy course with Strathclyde University shows you how to trace your family tree and also covers the use of DNA testing in genealogical research.

New Zealand is the latest country to do just that. It’s opened an embassy in Ireland for the first time for the express purpose of boosting trade and gaining access to Europe.

Winston Peters, New Zealand Minister for Foreign Affairs, attended the opening of the embassy in Dublin.

He told the guests and media: “The moment the Brexit decision happened on the 23 June 2016, it became very clear that we would have to, with respect to Ireland, set up an embassy here.

“It was one of the first decisions we made, and we could no longer think of carrying out the service from London, which had been going on in the past, that’s why we made the decision.

“We can be of assistance to the Irish in the Pacific and elsewhere, and we know the Irish can be a big help to us where the European Union is concerned, so if we both put our best foot forward we can deepen our relationship and mutually get more out of it.

“Brexit is a slow process, which won’t be over until March of next year, so in a way we’re getting ready early.

“This will have a lot of ramifications, we need to have a close relationship with Ireland and vice versa.

Interested in discovering more about your Irish roots? This free online genealogy course with Strathclyde University shows you how to trace your family tree and also covers the use of DNA testing in genealogical research.

“Ireland is stretching its reach off shore, it has always been a country that has seriously understood the importance of domestic and diplomatic relations.

“We’ve been big fans of the Irish for a long time, and we have a similar sense of justified defiance, so I think we’ll get along just fine.”

Following New Zealand’s decision to open an embassy in Dublin, the Irish President Michael D Higgins announced Ireland would open an embassy in New Zealand.

He said: “The decision to establish an embassy reflects an exceptionally close partnership between Ireland and New Zealand in international affairs, including at the United Nations.”

‘Let the Irish shoot each other’ – UK’s Brexit backers reach a new low

United Ireland is the only possible winning scenario after Britain leaves the EU, says United States-Canadian study 

Taoiseach says some British annoyed Ireland stood up for itself and won’t follow UK lead over Brexit

British blundering is making a United Ireland a real possibility as Brexit looks set to backfire

Did you know?

‘The Irish Robin Hood’ - Redmond O’Hanlon is a legendary figure in Ireland. His ancestors had been a powerful family up until the 17th century, when their land was taken during the Catholic uprising and the Cromwellian invasion. So he became a highwayman. Find out more.